http://dx.doi.org/10.18533/journal.v5i1.892

">
 

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-17-2016

Abstract

The small world of Nilo Cruz’s Anna in the Tropics brings to light a collision between historical and cultural forces personified in the play. It is this drama’s singular transitional moment, the end of the cycle for a way of life represented by Cruz’s characters that reverberates both tension and meaning for modern audiences. The resolution of a conflict between two of the play's central characters effects questions that hover over the play's final tragic tableaux. Their clash of seemingly justifiable positions frames Anna in the Tropics as a dialectical drama that is redolent in many ways of G.W.F.’s Hegel’s view of tragedy, as evidenced by his analysis of Sophocles’ Antigone. The dialectical form of Anna in the Tropics discloses what it means to enter a world of becoming for its immigrant characters of the Depression Era and for its modern audiences as well.

Publication

Journal of Arts and Humanities

Publisher

Maryland Institute of Research

City/State

Annapolis, Maryland

Volume

5

Issue

1

Pages

16-27

Department

College of Arts and Sciences

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.


Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.