Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-17-2016

Abstract

Winner of the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for drama, Nilo Cruz’s Anna in the Tropics has garnered critical acclaim for the poetic beauty of its dialogue as well as it strong emotional content. The intensity of its drama in many ways reflects the play’s use of traditional dramatic motifs, such as the family drama and the romantic triangle, to reveals its plot and the passions of its characters. An area, however, that criticism has neglected is what Anna in the Tropics says about the immigrant experience and cultural change both of which underscore its more obvious dramatic moments and are central to the historicity of the play and its themes. This paper through close analysis reveals the relationship between the form of the play– a dialectal tragedy – and these deeper social and cultural meanings. Dialectical tragedy as a way of realizing the movement of history and changes in culture in a drama begins with G.W.F’s Hegel’s theory of tragedy; as a result, this paper will superimpose the basic elements of Hegel’s theory upon Anna in the Tropics in an effort to see what lies beneath the play’s poetry and dramatic power and how the play speaks in larger terms to its audiences.

Publication

Journal of Arts and Humanities

Publisher

Maryland Institute of Research

City/State

Annapolis, Maryland

Volume

5

Issue

1

Pages

16-27

Department

College of Arts and Sciences

Comments

This is an open access article under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License, 2016.

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