Date of Award

2014

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EDD)

Degree Program

Educational Leadership

Department

College of Education

First Advisor

Korynne Taylor-Dunlop

Second Advisor

Suzanne King

Third Advisor

William Leary

Abstract

As the United States struggles to keep its students competitive in a global society, dropout rate reduction has been a priority for large urban school districts. Students have a less than a 50-50 chance of graduating from high school with their peers in big-city school districts like New York City and Chicago, where far fewer than half graduate each spring, according to a 2006 research study (Toppo, 2006). The promotion and implementation of parent involvement is a major key to confronting school dropout, especially low-income, minority students leaving school early without graduating. "Minority, low income families are repeatedly found to be greatly interested in their children's education and hold high expectations and goals of school success" (Pate1 and Stevens, 2010. p.120).

Students who drop out of school impact our entire society socially, politically and economically. The importance of designing programs to address students leaving school early without graduating is a priority for educators. The literature provides convincing evidence that parent involvement has a positive impact on students' attitudes about schooling (Griffiths-Prince. 2009). The literature maintains that early (elementary school) parent involvement and intervention is a necessary element to develop a mindset of respect and value for education (Williams-Jones. 2012).

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Education Commons

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